Combine that with the old "I can't reach parts of the screen when using the phone with one hand without holding the phone in a very precarious way" thing and you're just setting your users up for expensive accidents.

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I know smartphones are ubiquitous now but I'm kind of in awe that they are still designed to slide right out of your hand or on whatever surface you put them on unless you buy an aftermarket case or a pop socket.

Seems like a poor design choice!

Here are some October flowers. Can you spot my bee friend in the first picture?

I am waiting for a sourdough loaf to proof on the counter. The first one I tried tuesday didn't work out 😅

it is no longer Columbo day but i can't stop watching Columbo oh no

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If you're in the mood for getting spooky, you can't go wrong with a George C. Scott double feature: The Changeling, and Exorcist 3.

If you saw the second exorcist you probably wouldn't have much hope of a third one being any good, but it's great!

William Peter Blatty, who wrote the first, actually wrote and directed the third. It definitely shows its age a bit here and there, but overall it is a super strong horror film with a lot of great moments. See it.

Starting to think that folks on linux running tiling window managers who are OKAY with how much up front config they require maybe have some kind of stockholm syndrome

Will I be nerd sniped into trying to write that? I sure hope not.

Time will tell.

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Slowly making emacs mode progres. I am now trying to reverse engineer how org-mode collects all of its tests and runs them. This is a lot of unexpected work. Emacs I think really needs to put together a sort of test framework on top of `ert`.

A routine or function like '"run all tests in found in .el files in a directory called test" is not the kind of thing I want to be having to write myself. I want to write the mode, not a mini test framework.

Even trying to _read_ an emacs mode that has already been written is a herculean task that requires secret knowledge .

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Quickly realizing writing an emacs mode that goes beyond basic syntax highlighting is a herculean task that requires secret knowledge.

matty boosted

Me when someone claims they know exactly what a David Lynch movie is a about

The construction of the taxonomy was done through reader submissions, as well as submissions from Akasegawa and his students. My introduction to them was an English translation of the compiled articles in Shashin Jidai called Hyperart:Thomasson by Matt Fargo. I recommend that anyone interested in these fascinating things check out the following links to learn more.

I bet you’ve seen some yourself.

goodreads.com/book/show/653703

99percentinvisible.org/episode

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The hunt for thomassons – or hyperart – gained popularity after a series of articles were published in Shashin Jidai (Photo Times) by Byakuya-Shobō. An entire taxonomy of thomassons was developed, each uniquely fascinating.

You have the basics, like doors or stairs that go nowhere, to the amazing and bizarre like the “pure” thomassons that are now so far removed from their original purpose it is anyone’s guess as to what they were.

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Akasegawa and others described the various thomassons they discovered as “hyperart”.

Each thomasson shared the same characteristics: "an object which, just like a piece of art, has no purpose in society, but also, just like a piece of art is preserved with care, to the point where it appears to be on display. However, these objects do not appear to have a creator, making them even more art-like than regular art."

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The word Thomasson is an eponym named after the American baseball player Gary Thomasson. He went to Japan to play ball, and at the end of his career almost held the league's strikeout record. Again, according to wikipedia: Akasegawa viewed Thomasson's useless position on the team as a fitting analogy for "an object, part of a building, that was maintained in good condition, but with no purpose, to the point of becoming a work of art."

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Does anyone know what a thomasson is? Let me explain.

Wikipedia would describe a thomasson is a useless structure or relic that has been preserved as part of a building or environment that has become a sort of piece of art in itself. Examples would include some stairs that mysteriously go nowhere, a gate without a fence, an old now unused telephone pole standing free on its own, etc. On object that has the appearance of conceptual art even though they were not originally created to be such.

Finding quality follows on masto is a true challenge

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