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How to factory reset your Smart Bulbs.

1. Turn on for 8 seconds
2. Turn off for 2 seconds
3. Turn on for 8 seconds
4. Turn off for 2 seconds
5. Turn on for 8 seconds
6. Turn off for 2 seconds
7. Turn on for 8 seconds
8. Turn off for 2 seconds
9. Turn on for 8 seconds
10. Turn off for 2 seconds
11. Turn on

(╮°-°)╮┳━━┳ ( ╯°□°)╯ ┻━━┻

theverge.com/2019/6/20/1869258

@trickster @art to be fair, picking up a pattern you don’t trigger by accident may not be that easy

@pony At this point, you might as well require typing "reset" in Morse code to the bulb.

@pony Sure, from a design / management standpoint I understand how this happened. No place to put a reset pin on the bulb, you don't want to factory reset your bulb if your kid's fucking with it, etc, etc.

@trickster well there probably is a place to put a reset pin, most of these bulbs are bit of electronics, heatsink and mostly a lot of nothing

when nowadays people build these things ground up, why not go and replace the entire lighting wiring with some kind of a low voltage DC and data cable (not sure if a plain cat5 could do, likely not) and skip this entire bullshit

@trickster (and to think about it more, why do they even need to store any state over power cycles, so you’d need to ever reset them in any way)

@pony Because it has to store what color it's gonna be when powering on, or other stuff like that.

@trickster i mean, does it really, you are not supposed to turn the power off, you can, but not much would be lost if it just went to some default state

@pony yeah, it also sounds like a bad idea to me, but whatever mate, I'm not a bulbologist

@pony I'm sure they had their reasons for why a staple of electronics design wasn't good enough for their light bulb.

@pony @trickster POE lightbulb is probably stupid enough to carve some niche for itself, you may be onto something here

@piggo @trickster i thought they now make low voltage DC lighting circuits in new construction as we’re all now using LED’s anyway? sending bit of data over it (and like how much do you need) should let you avoid this entire zigbee wank or whatever they use

@pony @trickster that's not something I heard of, but it would make sense.. I have all LEDs, but 230 though

@pony @art @trickster TP-Link has the pattern of turning the bulb off and on three times in a fairly short duration. I can see how playing children may trigger this, which is a super valid point as we should design with children in mind. Still I think there is a case for teaching them not to play with the house electronics and giving them access to the IoT switch.
I have never triggered this accidentally nor have any visitors.

@art @pony @trickster I find it important that the people caring about usability, accessibility and privacy participate in these early IoT discussions with the bigger vendors.
We have good chances to prevent these almost unusable workflows from being baked into everyday devices.

@art
I absolutely hate that reset procedure.
It goes against every muscle memory I have for lightbulbs. Toggling them like that used to be a great way to blow them, now you WANT me to do it?

No thankyou.

@art OOK in action. You know like they say: A computerscientist only needs a magnet, a needle and a magnetic medium.

@art I have a sneaky suspicion that this is more than just trying to stop someone from fiddling with the light switch and accidentally resetting it.

It's to be annoying on purpose, so you are more likely to throw the bulb away and replace it with a new one.

These LED's don't need to be replaced as often... so they need to make a way so that you'll replace it more often.

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